Presentation: Welcome to the Family (WordCamp Toronto 2012)

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Managing Your Editorial Workflow (WordCamp Toronto 2011)

The video of presentation at WordCamp Toronto 2011 on “Managing your Editorial Workflow” where I talk mostly about Edit Flow.

Looks like the video was cut off, which is probably a good thing since it wasn’t really my best performance (being my first WordCamp presentation and all). I also flail my arms alot.

Mo Jangda: Managing Your Editorial Workflow | WordPress.tv.

WordPress Debugging (WordCamp NYC 2012 Talk)

Here’s my presentation slides from WordCamp NYC 2012. Click on the slide below to go full-screen and arrow keys to navigate.

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On $wpdb->prepare

If you do the following, you’re a terrible person:

$query = "SELECT ID from {$wpdb->posts} WHERE ID = %d";
$query = $wpdb->prepare( $query, $value );

There is absolutely no reason for prepare to be on a separate line.

Here’s how you do it the right way:

$query = $wpdb->prepare( "SELECT ID from {$wpdb->posts} WHERE ID = %d", $value );

One line. Simple, easy to read, and not confusing.

WordPress Distraction-Free Skin: Terminal/Matrix

Just Write! Like you're in the Matrix!

Because all the cool kids want to feel like they’re writing posts in the Matrix. (Inspired by Zen)


        
        

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Dogfooding Edit Flow

Note: Most of the code here is specific to my environment on Webfaction, github and for use with WordPress plugins. You can make it work for other setups (i.e. different hosts, local gits, or even SVN) but will involve some tweaking.


Scott recently had a great idea to run the bleeding edge release of Edit Flow on our official site. I usually do this for most of my plugins before releasing, though, it’s a manual process: FTP up the latest code and give it a test run. That’s not fun.

Here’s a far better, automatized way to keep your repo up-to-date. You can either use cron or githooks. Pick your poison.

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