Philip Pullman on the upcoming library closures in…

Philip Pullman on the upcoming library closures in Oxfordshire:

I love the public library service for what it did for me as a child and as a student and as an adult. I love it because its presence in a town or a city reminds us that there are things above profit, things that profit knows nothing about, things that have the power to baffle the greedy ghost of market fundamentalism, things that stand for civic decency and public respect for imagination and knowledge and the value of simple delight.

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Leave the libraries alone. You don’t know the value of what you’re looking after. It is too precious to destroy.

He also brilliantly discusses my exact sentiments on the magic that is reading:

But what a gift to give a child, this chance to discover that you can love a book and the characters in it, you can become their friend and share their adventures in your own imagination.

And the secrecy of it! The blessed privacy! No-one else can get in the way, no-one else can invade it, no-one else even knows what’s going on in that wonderful space that opens up between the reader and the book. That open democratic space full of thrills, full of excitement and fear, full of astonishment, where your own emotions and ideas are given back to you clarified, magnified, purified, valued. You’re a citizen of that great democratic space that opens up between you and the book.

(If you haven’t already, check out the His Dark Materials series by Pullman — it has the exact sort of “wonderful space” he’s talking about.)